We do more than just fund research.

We attend research meetings, serve on grant committee’s, advocate, educate and run online support groups, just to list a few ways we spend our time.  However, we want you to also see we are intensely focused on funding high quality research, because we feel that is where the rubber meets the road.


The IBC Network Foundation: Funding History

Total funding released for research (2012-2017): $900,860.54

June 2017

June 3, 2017 – The IBC Network Foundation supported new research at Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center under the direction of Justin Balko, Pharm.D., Ph.D.  and Carlos L. Arteaga, M.D.  The goal of this grant is to utilize existing models of inflammatory breast cancer and generate additional models that can be studied on a molecular level to advance therapies for both triple-negative and inflammatory breast cancer.  This funding is part the second part of a one year commitment.

See all details of research in June 2016 funding information.

Funding: $50,000

March 2017

March 27, 2017 – The IBC Network Foundation supported MD Anderson’s Morgan Welch Clinic clinical trial under the direction of Dr. Wendy Woodward.  The research to be conducted is to test the hypothesis that targeting the normal cells in the breast stroma that help IBC act badly will improve outcomes because IBC is specifically driven by these cells.  MD Anderson will test several new drugs to try to take the breaks off the immune system to test this hypothesis, if the funds for the research can be raised.  They propose to combine exciting new immunotherapy drugs with the standard treatment of using drugs targeting the tumor.  If this hypothesis proves to be true in the lab, clinical trials could follow very quickly.

Some aggressive non-IBC tumors are also helped by normal cells and these studies should help people with other types of cancer as well.

Funding:  The total required for this project is $62,500.  Due to the overwhelming success of the Alligator’s Hunt for Hope, raising $102,560.54 we will fund this project as well as an additional project at the Morgan Welch Clinic.  Details forthcoming.

 

March 27, 2017 – The IBC Network Foundation supported MD Anderson’s Morgan Welch Clinic clinical trial under the direction of Dr. Ueno. The project is to determine if the addition of a statin to standard therapy will be effective in reducing the chance of IBC/TNBC recurrence.  This funding is part of a three year commitment, with $75,000 to be release each Spring and Fall.  This is year two of the three year commitment.

See all details of research in February 2016 funding information.

Funding: $75,000

February 2017

February 7, 2017 – The IBC Network Foundation is starting off the new year by continuing the support of the project under the director of Dr. Kenneth van Golen, as outlined in our December 2016 funding.

Funding: $12,000. with the final installment of $26,000 fall of 2017.

December 2016

December 12, 2016 – The IBC Network Foundation supported a research project at University of Delaware under the direction of Dr. Kenneth van Golen.   The overall project is based on previous observations made by  Dr. van Golen’s lab with Dr. Steven Van Laere in Belgium and is meant to put some translational biology to observations they have made both in culture and in patient samples regarding TGFbeta expression and signaling.  The overall goal is to understand how skin metastases occur in IBC and eventually find a way to block their formation. (note, we supported this research from the first, this is an continuing of that discovery science)

Funding: $14,000. with a commitment for more support in Spring of 2017

December 12, 2016 -The IBC Network Foundation supported new translational research at Dana Farber Cancer Institute under the direction of Dr. Beth Overmeyor. The DF/HCC phase II trial of preoperative therapy for HER2 positive inflammatory breast cancer.  The molecular analysis of inflammatory breast cancer reveals a propensity to segregate into more proliferative intrinsic subtypes, such as HER2 positive (+).

(Please see July 2016 funding for all details)

Funding: $50,000

August 2016

August 23, 2016 – For the first time, MD Anderson has a campaign to allow departments to fund-raise, in a new effort called the Boot Walk to #endcancer.  In support of this effort, we offered to match the first $5,000 donated.  All funds will be used for IBC research.

Funding:  $5,000 to be used specifically for IBC research only.

Footnote.  September 26, 2016 an additional $5,000 was granted.

November 10, 2016 – An additional $1,800 funded was given to this project via a special donation given to us, targeted for this fundraising event.

July 2016

July 7, 2016 – The IBC Network Foundation supported new translational research at Dana Farber Cancer Institute under the direction of Dr. Beth Overmeyor. The DF/HCC phase II trial of preoperative therapy for HER2 positive inflammatory breast cancer.  The molecular analysis of inflammatory breast cancer reveals a propensity to segregate into more proliferative intrinsic subtypes, such as HER2 positive (+). Studies demonstrate a 30-40% incidence of HER2+ disease among IBC, which is more than twice the incidence in non-IBC. The prevalence of HER2+ IBC and the availability of agents targeting HER2 support investigation into the optimal preoperative regimen incorporating HER2 targeting agents. DF/HCC has an ongoing preoperative trial evaluating combination therapies in patients with newly diagnosed HER2+ IBC, with the goal of maximizing HER2-directed therapy and minimizing chemotherapy exposure.

This clinical trial includes patients with HER2+ Stage III IBC (male or female) who are eligible if they have not received prior therapy for breast cancer and are willing to undergo 2 research biopsies of the affected breast for correlative assays (funded by this grant).  Tumor biopsy specimens are obtained to investigate the following: (1) To determine whether the pre-treatment status of the tumor predicts HER2-resistance, next-generation sequencing technology will be employed to explore gene expression patterns including PAM50-based intrinsic subtyping. This investigation will be done in collaboration with investigators at Harvard Medical School, the University of North Carolina and at the University of Michigan. The results of this trial will not only provide key information about the biology of IBC and the mechanisms of HER2 therapy resistance, but will support a treatment paradigm that will spare countless women with IBC the toxicity of unnecessary chemotherapy which is administered based upon clinical trial results that involve insufficient numbers of IBC patients.

Funding:  The total required for this project is $100,000.   The IBC Network Foundation has committed to this project and funded the first portion on July 7, 2016 and the remaining $50,000 will be funded in December 2016.

We arranged to co-fund the first portion of this project with the Karen Oldman Foundation.  The Karen Oldman Foundation contributed $20,000 and The IBC Network Foundation contributed $30,000 for a total grant of $50,000.  We truly extend our most heartfelt thanks for Suzanne Mader and the board of the Karen Oldman Foundation for their support.

June 2016

June 1, 2016 – The IBC Network Foundation supported new research at Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center under the direction of Justin Balko, Pharm.D., Ph.D.  and Carlos L. Arteaga, M.D.  The goal of this grant is to utilize existing models of inflammatory breast cancer and generate additional models that can be studied on a molecular level to advance therapies for both triple-negative and inflammatory breast cancer.  In addition, they will try to understand how the individual cells within these models are influenced by factors called ‘cytokines’.  Ultimately, they hope that improving our understanding of the role of these factors across IBC and TNBC models will result in new therapies to better treat patients with these unique and devastating subtypes of breast cancer.

Funding:  The total required for this project is $100,000.   The IBC Network Foundation has committed to this project and funded $50,000 on June 1, 2016 and the remaining $50,000 will be funded June 2017.

February 2016

February 15, 2016 – The IBC Network Foundation supported MD Anderson’s Morgan Welch Clinic clinical trial under the direction of Dr. Ueno. The project is to determine if the addition of a statin to standard therapy will be effective in reducing the chance of IBC/TNBC recurrence. This trial is based on considerable rationale from the Morgan Welch clinic that in preclinical models, statins reduce inflammation and target treatment-resistant cells (called cancer stem cells). This is a randomized phase II study that will be held at MD Anderson Cancer Center under the direction of Dr. Ueno. (Please note that the preclinical work for this trial was originally funded by our foundation in May of 2013, a history making event. This current grant is to our knowledge the only patient-advocate funded clinical trial)

Funding:  This will be a three year project that started in the summer of 2016.  This initial funding was possible in large part from the proceeds of an event inspired by an IBC patient, Ashleigh Royalty Range.

Funding: $150,000

February 11, 2016 – The IBC Network Foundation supported a research project at University of Delaware under the direction of Dr. Kenneth Van Golen.   The overall project is based on previous observations made by  Dr. Van Golen’s lab with Dr. Steven Van Laere in Belgium and is meant to put some translational biology to observations they have made both in culture and in patient samples regarding TGFbeta expression and signaling.  The overall goal is to understand how skin metastases occur in IBC and eventually find a way to block their formation.

Funding: $7,500.

November 21, 2015

The IBC Network Foundation supported Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and Dr. Arteaga and Dr. Balko’s research through a discovery grant—seed funding for scientists to pursue bold research ideas that can lead to breakthrough discoveries. The research will examine genetic alterations in patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Inflammatory Breast Cancer to help guide a more precise treatment. Vanderbilt investigators were the first to identify and explore a particular variance – amplification of the JAK2 gene – which may lead to rapid disease progression and possibly resistance to chemotherapy. Improving our understanding of this alteration and associated therapies could ultimately reduce disease recurrence and mortality.

Funding:  The total required for this project is $100,000.   The IBC Network Foundation has committed to this project and funded $50,000 on December 12, 2014 and the remaining $50,000 on November 21, 2015.

April 6, 2015

Due to a special “Alligator’s Hunt for Hope” hosted via the family of Carter Lee, The IBC Network Foundation is able to start early in the year of 2015 by underwriting research.  In the “Axl Project”  under  Xiaoping Wang, Ph.D, she found that IBC tissue samples from patients, but not normal breast tissue samples from patients, have high levels of TIG1 protein (Tazarotene-induced gene-1 (TIG1) is a protein which has been implicated as a putative tumor suppressor). Levels of TIG1 protein are also higher in IBC cell lines than in non-inflammatory breast cancer cell lines. Dr. Wang also found that IBC patients with high levels of TIG1 protein have a shorter survival duration than those with low-expressing tumors. When the amount of TIG1 protein in IBC cells is experimentally reduced, the proliferation, migration, and invasion of these cells significantly slows down, suggesting that TIG1 protein may promote the growth and invasion of IBC cells. More importantly, when IBC cells with reduced amount of TIG1 protein were injected into mice, they generated much smaller tumors compared to original IBC cells, suggesting that TIG1 protein may promotes tumor growth. Also she found that the effects of TIG1 in IBC may be mediated by a protein called receptor tyrosine kinase Axl. IBC patient samples with high levels of TIG1 protein frequently also have high levels of Axl protein. When they treated IBC cells with Axl inhibitor, they  found the proliferation, migration, and invasion of IBC cells were significantly reduced. In summary, this work has demonstrated that TIG1 is one factor responsible for the aggressiveness of IBC and TIG1 and Axl proteins are potential therapeutic targets for patients with IBC.

Funding:  The minimum funding required for the research is $50,000.  The Alligator’s Hunt for Hope raised $83,000 which was funded April 6, 2014.

Update May 2016

December 2014

The IBC Network Foundation supported Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and Dr. Arteaga and Dr. Balko’s research through a discovery grant—seed funding for scientists to pursue bold research ideas that can lead to breakthrough discoveries. The research will examine genetic alterations in patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Inflammatory Breast Cancer to help guide a more precise treatment. Vanderbilt investigators were the first to identify and explore a particular variance – amplification of the JAK2 gene – which may lead to rapid disease progression and possibly resistance to chemotherapy. Improving our understanding of this alteration and associated therapies could ultimately reduce disease recurrence and mortality.

Funding:  The total required for this project is $100,000.  The IBC Network Foundation has committed to this project by funding $50,000 on December 12, 2014 and the remaining $50,000 in December 2015.

Update April 2016

November 2014

The IBC Network Foundation supported the research of Dr. Massimo Cristofanilli at Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, PA.   The purpose of the grant is to further research by sponsoring seed funding for what is commonly referred to as a “blood biopsy”  The study is titled “Novel non-invasive markers for the early detection of inflammatory breast cancer through comprehensive genomic profiling”. Currently, IBC lacks a molecular definition and known genetic markers, making early diagnosis difficult. The goal of this study is to identify genomic markers using the latest DNA sequencing technologies (next-generation sequencing/NGS) that are specific for IBC, so that they might be used in the future to non-invasively identify IBC prior to symptoms developing. Earlier diagnosis of IBC will allow earlier treatment which will improve patient outcomes in this aggressive disease.

Funding: $70,000. We arranged to co-fund this project with the Karen Oldman Foundation.  The Karen Oldman Foundation contributed $25,000 and The IBC Network Foundation contributed $45,000 for a total grant of $70,000.   We truly extend our most heartfelt thanks for Suzanne Mader and the board of the Karen Oldman Foundation for their support.

Update April 2016

ADDENDUM October 2016 Due to staff changes at Jefferson, not allowing this research to be completed, the grant was refunded to the two supporting charities in full.  Future grant applications from the principal investigator will be considered if/when received.

February 2014

The IBC Network Foundation supported the research of Dr. Bisrat Debeb, Assistant Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. The purpose of the grant is to further research in the area of Inflammatory Breast Cancer, specifically to research the therapeutic targeting of a key regulator of brain metastasis. Brain metastases occur in about 40% of HER2+ IBC patients and 30% of triple-negative IBC patients and are a frequent cause of death due to the lack of effective treatments.

Funding: $50,000.

Update April 2016

May 2013

The IBC Network Foundation supported the research of Dr. Ueno on the effects of statins as adjuvant  therapy in IBC. Statins are commonly used drugs to lower cholesterol, and retrospective analysis showed that IBC patients who were already taking a statin on average had improved progression-free survival. However, the biological effects of statins in IBC preclinical models and in combination with standard therapies were not previously known. This grant was aimed at filling that gap in knowledge, a necessary pre-requisite to launching a prospective clinical trial to determine whether taking a statin would increase outcomes in IBC patients who don’t otherwise need to decrease their cholesterol. This trial has now been funded by a subsequent grant in February 2016.

Funding: $75,000.

Update July 2014

April 2012

Our first project.

The IBC Network Foundation supported a clinical trial of an HDAC inhibitor for decreasing the symptoms from pleural effusion under the direction of Dr. Wendy Woodward, an IBC specialist at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  Pleural effusions (PE)  are rapid collections of fluid in the surface of the lungs due to tumor cells growing there, causing considerable respiratory symptoms. PEs are not uncommon sites of metastasis in IBC, and unfortunately the outlook is currently bleak due to the lack of specific therapies. Death from IBC pleural effusion can be slow and not painless. Can you imagine not being able to breathe? We hope that successfully completing this trial will not only directly benefit the patients on this trial, but future fighters as well.  We issued funding for this project April 30, 2012 at MD Anderson in the Mays Clinic main lobby.   Thank you for making our first project, named in honor of Lori Grennan, a reality.

Funding: $30,000

 

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